U.S. Ports to See Modest Growth in 2016 -Moody’s

U.S. Ports to See Modest Growth in 2016 -Moody’s

U.S. Ports to See Modest Growth in 2016 -Moody’s

Container cargo volume growth through U.S. ports will slow in 2016 as demand for American exports remains weak and U.S. retailers work through high inventories, according to a report by Moody’s Investors Service.

Moody’s said it expects container volume will rise 3% to 4% next year, down from 5% growth this year.

The strong growth in 2015 was due in part to a large influx of container cargo after West Coast dockworkers reached terms of a multi-year contract with their port employers in late February. During the months-long negotiation process, which began in May of 2014, the West Coast ports experienced periods of excessive delays with cargo ships waiting to enter the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach for weeks.

wsj

U.S. Ports to See Modest Growth in 2016 -Moody’s

6 major ways transportation will change by 2045

6 major ways transportation will change by 2045

Transportation has evolved relatively slowly.

Sure, trains and cars have drastically improved since their introduction in the early 19th century. But really, we still rely on these old, albeit modified, forms of transportation.

In the next 30 years, though, we are likely to see more change in transportation technology than we’ve seen in the last 100 years.

A rendering of how London will look in 2045.
A rendering of how London will look in 2045

Ian Pearson, an engineer and a fellow at the World Academy for Arts and Science, recently told Tech Insider some of the big changes we can look forward to.

The futurologist with an 85% accuracy track record noted that in 10 years time, driverless transportation will be ubiquitous.

But there’s more to look forward to then just driverless transportation. Within the next 30 years, Pearson envisions a future where space travel is common and Hyperloop systems are abundant.

Here’s a look a breakdown of his boldest predictions:

You’ll be able to ride a Hyperloop by 2025

youll-be-able-to-ride-a-hyperloop-by-2025
You’ll be able to ride a Hyperloop by 2025

Traveling via Hyperloop will be here before we know it.

In fact, a few start-ups aim to break ground on the Hyperloop, which is a futuristic tubular system that shoots pod-like capsules between destinations at speeds of more than 500 miles per hour, as soon as next year.

California-based startup Hyperloop Technologies is planning on building three hyperloops by 2020 and Hyperloop Transportation Technologies plans on breaking ground on a five-mile test track in 2016.

Pearson said by 2050, Hyperloops will be a pretty normal form of transportation.

Flying cars will exist in the coming years.

Above is a demo of the AeroMobil 3.0, a prototype of a flying car unveiled in Vienna during the Pioneers Festival in 2014.

Pearson points to the success of prototypes such as the AeroMobil 3.0 as signs that flying cars will exist in the future. Pearson declined to give a specific date, noting that we’ve already started seeing prototypes.

However, he said he doesn’t see them becoming a popular form of transit because of safety challenges. The flying cars Pearson envisions will be able to hover above the ground at any altitude, but they won’t zip around like in popular movie depictions.

“There might be some flying cars, but not very many,” he said. “They would have to be self-flying cars, there’s no way ordinary people would fly them.”

People will be driven around in driverless pods by 2025

People will be driven around in driverless pods by 2025.
People will be driven around in driverless pods by 2025

Pearson said that in 10 years, driverless systems will be ubiquitous, but we’ll have already evolved past self-driving cars.

Pearson said he thinks people will be able to own their own “cheap steel box” and control it themselves using a phone. The boxes Pearson is envisioning will not have wheels, making them even cheaper. He envisions the structure will use a technology that was patented in the early 20th century — magnetic levitation — to propel them.

It will be possible to ride in a hypersonic jet high in the atmosphere by 2040

It will be possible to ride in a hypersonic jet high in the atmosphere by 2040.
It will be possible to ride in a hypersonic jet high in the atmosphere by 2040

Hypersonic aircrafts that fly high in the air will exist in 2040, but the cost of riding one will reserve it for the super wealthy.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actually approved a patent for an airbus that could transport you from London to New York in just one hour.

Super tall buildings will serve as spaceports by 2045

Super tall buildings will serve as spaceports by 2045.
Super tall buildings will serve as spaceports by 2045

By 2045, there may be buildings constructed of “super-strong carbon-based materials” that are 18 to 24 miles high, Pearson said. And atop these giant structures could be spaceports, Pearson told Tech Insider.

Building launch sites at the top of very tall buildings may sound far-fetched, but Pearson said that as building materials evolve, giant high-rises will be able to support such activity. And as space travel becomes more common, these spaceports could also prove to be a more efficient way of launching spacecraft.

“At height extremes, a London Spaceport is likely by 2045 as the space industry explodes. There is a huge cost advantage going to space from as high a base as possible, so a spaceport is very likely to be over 10 km and even as much as 30 km, using carbon-based materials,” Pearson wrote in a report.

To increase speed, airplanes might not have windows by 2045

To increase speed, airplanes might not have windows by 2045
To increase speed, airplanes might not have windows by 2045

Pearson said that airplanes will continue to evolve over the next 30 years to become faster. As a result, it’s likely that windows might start disappearing from airplanes altogether so that planes are stronger and better equiped to handle faster speeds.

Augmented reality will make it possible to entirely replace windows, Pearson said.

6 major ways transportation will change by 2045

Vans of the rich and gridlocked

Vehicles that make waiting in traffic a pleasure.

The vans take up to seven months to complete and come with such features as touch-screen computers, wireless Internet, cable TV, seats for half a dozen people, bathrooms—and, in one case, an exercise bicycle welded to the floor so the owner could work out.

Vans of the rich and gridlocked

Floating mag-lev high speed rail could whisk you from D.C. to N.Y. in an hour

Rush hour traffic and working within 50 miles of your home could soon be so passé. In the commute of tomorrow, you may be able to float from one major city to another in one hour or less.

That’s because a group of private investors is seeking to do what the federal government has been trying to pull off for years: bring super fast trains to the United States.

Floating mag-lev high speed rail could whisk you from D.C. to N.Y. in an hour.

Transportation Solutions Through Big Data

It’s a crucial time in the development of urban mobility. Game-changing initiatives are in the works across many different areas, such as bike-sharing, peer-to-peer car sharing, smart parking, and dynamic signs.

Transportation Solutions Through Big Data.

The future of urban transit?

Say you step off a train in a new city and need to get to your hotel, about a mile away. Most taxi drivers don’t want to take people such a short distance. But with your luggage, it’s too far to walk.

Someday, there may be a third option: Urban transit systems built around small electric vehicles, or pods, that drive themselves.

Supporters of these driverless pods say they take up less space than cars, cut down on urban noise and produce zero emissions. And they offer more flexibility: Instead of relying on a set schedule, riders can summon these pods for private, individual trips.

The CNN 10: Better by Design – CNN.com.

 

Floating Trains

Floating Trains

Japan sees magnetic-levitation rail system spurring country’s technological rebirth.

Japan Pins Hopes on Floating Trains – WSJ.

 

Fewer Cargo Planes, More Cargo in Passenger Planes

For the world’s biggest maker of air freighters, the most formidable competition is coming from the bellies of its own passenger planes. Sales of cargo versions of Boeing’s (BA) 777 and 747-8 aircraft have stalled as British Airways (IAG:LN), Delta Air Lines (DAL), FedEx (FDX), operator of the world’s largest cargo airline, and other carriers ground older cargo planes and transfer freight to Boeing’s widebody 777 passenger jets. The shift is forcing Boeing to rethink its cargo business as a glut of large passenger jets hits the market over the next two years.

Boeing Cargo Planes Lose to Boeing Passenger Planes – Businessweek.